Stress in the work place

I recently gave a talk to staff at Canterbury Combined Court Centre about stress in the workplace.  It was apparent how widespread this problem is.  Below is an article from Sky News on this topic.

Taken from Sky News:

Mental illness cost the UK economy up to £100bn last year prompting calls for speeding up care through the health system.

The chief medical officer said there has been a 24% increase in the number of working days lost to stress, depression and anxiety since 2009.

Professor Dame Sally Davies said around 70 million working days were lost to mental illness in 2013.

In her latest annual report, Dame Sally said more needed to be done to help people battling mental illness to remain in work.

She said: “The costs of mental illness to the economy are astounding. Through this report, I urge commissioners and decision-makers to treat mental health more like physical health.

“Anyone with mental illness deserves good quality support at the right time.

“One of the stark issues highlighted in this report is that 60-70% of people with common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety are in work, so it is crucial that we take action to help those people stay in employment to benefit their own health as well as the economy.”

Dr Peter Carter, chief executive and general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, said: “The treatment gap for people with mental health problems can no longer be ignored.

“Not only are people with mental health problems in need of better support for their mental health conditions, but there is an unacceptable and preventable level of correlation with physical ill health.”

Stephen Dalton, chief executive of the NHS Confederation’s Mental Health Network, added: “We welcome this bold report and its important contribution to a long overdue national debate.”

Helping people to change their limiting beliefs, for example taking them through the Thrive training programme, would help enormously to lessen this increasingly prevalent problem.

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